Ready to Fly Higher? Let's Go!

Weekly Insights and Inspiration for Flying Higher in Endeavors that Make a Difference

Resilience

“What man actually needs is not a tensionless state but rather the striving and struggling for some goal worthy of him.”—Viktor Frankl

At the beginning of this week, I encouraged building some intentional “quiet time” into your day-to-day lives. Paradoxically, it may seem, today I’m encouraging you to build in some struggle!

“It is difficulties that show what men are.”—Epictetus

Progress is facilitated when training is put into practice. You need obstacles, challenges, and misfortune that test and push your abilities.

Don’t hide from or avoid these moments. Welcome them. Embrace them. “Thank” them.

People, situations, and circumstances that encourage us to exercise and employ what you’ve learned are why you practice and prepare. You’ll grow or you’ll learn. Either is a lesson worth the time and effort.

“A setback has often cleared the way for greater prosperity. Many things have...
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Are You Navigating Life with a Map or a Compass?

stoicism May 11, 2018

“Dwell on the beauty of life. Watch the stars, and see yourself running with them.” ― Marcus Aurelius

In an age that seems to reward certainty and confidence, it's tempting to look for a map. The shortest, fastest, and easiest way to get where you want to go (or worse, where others think you should want to go).

The problem with maps is they can only take you where others have already been. They can't reveal the best course for you. Only a compass can do that.

Maps require obedience. Compasses cultivate empowerment.

Employing a compass over a map requires curiosity and courage. A willingness to learn as you go. It allows for course correction and tacking. The compass invites adventure and fellow travelers.

Are you trying to find your way or follow someone else's? Do you need a map or a compass?

Keep flying higher!

Scott

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Getting Out of Your Own Way (By Getting Out of Your Own Head)

We spend a lot of time in our own heads. Probably more than is healthy. And much of this narrative is feeding questionable agendas and assumptions about ourselves, our situation, and those who surround us.

Piercing the veil of our self-fulfilling self-talk is an exercise worth doing more often. Here's a one-minute exercise that can help you "zoom out," provide a bit of context, and encourages empathy and cosmopolitanism.

It's called Hierocles' Concentric Circles of Concern. Starting with yourself, reach out to ever-widening circles of contacts and imagine pulling those people closer to yourself and into the previous circle. Your family, your friends, your neighbors, people living in the same city or town, and so on and on. You can extend this exercise all the way out to the planet and beyond.

Want to learn more? My friend, Massimo Pigliucci, shares more about this practice and its history in his blog.

What could you accomplish if you got out of your head and into the...

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Why I Run at the Cemetery

"Think of yourself as dead. You have lived your life. Now, take what’s left and live it properly." – Marcus Aurelius, Meditations 7.56

I go for my daily run at the cemetery. It's my memento mori practice. “Remember, you die.” My cemetery run is a time to reflect on mortality. It inspires me to live the rest of my day more fully.

Every cemetery run is an opportunity not only to contemplate my journey from womb to tomb, but it’s also a call to employ myself in work that’s worth it.

This ritual reminds me of the transience of earthly things and the futility of ego attachments.

My cemetery run reminds me to return to the here and now, and do the work I’m meant to do. That work begins with the work of being a human being. Cultivating character and enhancing my life by elevating the lives of others.

What do you think? Is it possible that contemplating your death might inspire you to start living well?

Keep flying higher!

Scott

Have you seen the...

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Love, Art, & Tranquility

Gratitude is baked into many of the reflections Marcus Aurelius wrote in his journal. What I love about this quote, is that it reminds me that art is any work that matters. Acts done with intention and done to enhance the lives of others. Art is music, painting, and fiction for sure. But art is also how you engage as a spouse, parent, employee, or entrepreneur. We practice art when we make a meal, make amends, and clean up a mess.
 
 
Art isn't work you have to do. It's work you get to do. It's the work of empathetic, generous, and thoughtful human beings. People like you and me. People who engage with others not for what they can get, but for what they can give. Work done based on attachment to selfish results leads to suffering. Work done in service to others brings peace of mind.
 
"Love the humble art you have learned and take rest in it." - Marcus Aurelius
 
And fly a little higher this weekend. We need you!
 
Scott
 
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The Good Life

Marcus Aurelius is often called the last of the “good emperors” of the Roman Empire. A man who stood above questioning who questioned himself daily. Marcus’ reminders to himself about the importance of virtue and justice inspire me and many others to this day.

“To live the good life. We have the potential for it. If we can learn to be indifferent to what makes no difference.” — Marcus Aurelius

What does it mean to be human? What does it mean to be happy? These are questions we’ve asked ourselves since the dawn of time. Many of us are overwhelmed by such questions. But here, Marcus reminds himself of his agency over his perceptions, thoughts, and actions and therefore the power he has to maintain his sense of well-being in any situation or circumstance.

In this quote, Marcus is reminding himself of a lesson from one of the ancient world’s greatest teachers, Epictetus: “It isn’t events themselves that disturb...

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Everyone's a Creative. Are You Ready to Be an Artist?

Do You Know That You’re Lying?

“Let’s start with a quick poll. Raise your hand if you’re a Creative. Great! If your hand is raised, put it back down. Now, raise your hand if you’re not a Creative. That's interesting. Keep your hand raised. Alright, if your hand is raised, keep it raised if you know you’re lying…!”

This poll is how I open my workshops on becoming a “bulletproof creative” (aka a Thriving Artist). The results are always about the same. One-third raise their hands to the opening query, another third to the next, and the final third to the last (often with nervous laughter).

We Are All Creatives

Here’s the deal: everyone is a Creative. A Creative is simply someone who brings something into the world that didn’t previously exist. Every time you make a meal, make a mess, or make amends, you’ve engaged in an act of creation. Creating is an everyday human activity.

Whether you’re a musician,...

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“Here, I Made This. I Hope You Like It….” Feedback Vs. Criticism

Creating is simply the act of making something new. However, simple doesn’t mean easy. The creative process can be lonely, intimidating, and fraught with self-doubt. Then comes the hard part...sharing what you made with others. 

Do I Have to Share?

That depends. We’re all creatives. We make things, right? We make conversation. We make plans. We make promises, and we make babies. We have absolutely no problem making or sharing these creations. However, when we intentionally create something that will evoke a reaction or even a transformation in others, when we start acting like artists, things change.

Therein lies the rub. All artists are creatives, but not all creatives are artists. Artists create with intention and motivation. They put their creation out into the world. They ship and they deliver the goods.

Artists must share their creations. That's the only way they will get the feedback required to develop and improve their art. Aspiring and advancing artists must...

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Beliefs Are Bogus

creativity stoicism Nov 21, 2017

The Case for Values

It is impossible for a man to learn what he thinks he already knows." - Epictetus

We are driven by our beliefs. We live by them and die for them. And far too often we cleave to them in the face of evidence that they are not absolutes or even true. We believe that our beliefs define who we are and seek out those who believe what we believe and turn up our nose at, or even rail against, those who do not. But here's the thing...,

beliefs are bogus.

Not always, of course, but far more often than we care to admit. Sadly, these bogus beliefs are usually the ones we cling to most desperately. And this dynamic is doing immense harm to our physical, mental, and spiritual well-being. It's destroying our relationships and, indeed, the planet on which we live.

What to do? It's time we seek out what really defines us. Our values speak to who we truly are. 

What's the Difference?

Beliefs are nothing more than opinion or conviction. An internal feeling that...

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The Day I Met Seth Godin (And How He Made Cry…)!

If you have a minute, I’d like to tell you a quick story.

If you check out The Stoic Creativative on Amazon, you’ll probably take note of this 5-star review.

“Scott will open your eyes to a different way of doing work that matters. His generous, persistent, consistent belief in our ability to level up and contribute comes through. This is time well spent.” Seth Godin

Yes, that review came from the Seth Godin. Seth is the best-selling author of Purple Cow and 17 other books, the creator of the altMBA and The Marketing Seminar, and the longest-running and most read blogger I know.

He’s also one of my heroes.

“How Did You Get Seth Godin to Review Your Handbook?”

I get this question a lot!

The truth is, I didn’t “get” Seth to do anything! I never even asked him to look at my Handbook!

A Bit of Back Story

I am an altMBA6 graduate and was invited by Seth to participate in the first run of The Marketing Seminar in the summer of...

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